BAM’s Basic Bunting – new knitting pattern!

As promised, here’s my super easy pattern for knitted bunting!

BAM's basic bunting

You don’t need any fancy knitting skills to make this basic bunting! Each triangle is worked from the pointy tip upwards with steady increases every third row after row 5. Once you get the hang of the pattern it’s easy to make the triangles bigger if you want to, or you can cast off as soon as you reach the size you want.

Knitted bunting closeup

I’ve used a narrow garter stich border to discourage curling, so the first and last two stitches of each row are always knitted, even on a purl row. The last 4 rows are all knit rows to complete the garter stitch border.

To keep things simple you work the increases by working into the front and back of a stitch. If you’re not sure how to knit into the front and back of a stitch check out this youtube video. It really is very easy!

For advice on blocking and assembling your bunting see the notes at the end.

BAM’s Basic Bunting

Yarn: I’ve knitted this in different yarns from double knit to chunky. Obviously the finer the yarn the smaller the bunting, so if you want to achieve the same overall size you will need to knit more rows to compensate.

Needles: Use a size 1mm larger than the recommended for the yarn to help it hang well.

Finished size: When I used Stylecraft Special Aran and 6mm needles each triangle measured 14cm x 14cm before blocking and 17.cm x 17.5cm after blocking.

k – knit

kfb – knit into the front and back of the stitch

p –purl

pfb – purl into the front and back of the stitch

Cast on 2 stitches

Row 1: k2 (RS)

Row 2: k2

Row 3: kfb in each stitch (4)

Row 4: k4

Row 5: k1 kfb in next 2 stitches k1 (6)

Row 6: k2 p2 k2

Row 7: k6

Row 8: k2 pfb in next 2 stitches k2 (8)

Row 9: k8

Row 10: k2 p4 k2

Row 11: k2 kfb k2 kfb k2 (10)

Row 12: k2 p6 k2

Row 13: k10

Row 14: k2 pfb p4 pfb k2 (12)

Row 15: k12

Row 16: k2 p8 k2

Row 17: k2 kfb k6 kfb k2 (14)

Row 18: k2 p10 k2

Row 19: k14

Row 20: k2 pfb p8 pfb k2 (16)

Row 21: k16

Row 22: k2 p12 k2

Row 23: k2 kfb k10 kfb k2 (18)

Row 24: k2 p14 k2

Row 25: k18

Row 26: k2 pfb p12 pfb k2 (20)

Row 27: k20

Row 28: k2 p16 k2

Row 29: k2 kfb k14 kfb k2 (22)

Row 30: k2 p18 k2

Row 31: k22

Row 32: k2 kfb k16 kfb k2

Row 33: k24

Row 34: k24

Cast off.

Make 7 triangles.

To join either:

  1. With a 4.5mm or 5mm crochet hook chain 50, then working from right to left with the right side facing you, *double crochet (single crochet in US terms) into each knitted stitch along the top of your first triangle then chain 10. Repeat from * with each triangle. Chain 50 after final triangle to match the other side. This is my preferred method because you get longer bunting with the same number of triangles, and the crochet chain makes it easy to hang the bunting.
  2. Substitute the crochet for a ribbon and sew the triangles directly on to it.
  3. Sew the corners of the triangles tip to tip and add a decorative button hide the joins.

bead and button knitted bunting

Blocking

Blocking your triangles makes a big difference to how well the bunting hangs, and it can be done before or after you join them all together. I generally use acrylic yarn for my bunting and I block it by steaming it with my iron. Ironing acrylic yarn directly is a TERRIBLE IDEA but blasting it with steam whilst making sure the iron NEVER touches the yarn itself will work wonders.

Before and after steam blocking

Before and after steam blocking

Check out this video to see how it works. The demo is with crochet but the same principles apply.

Variations

The real joy of this pattern is that it is very simple, making it ideal for customising and personalising any way you like! I love stripes so I usually do at least a couple of striped triangles, but if you are good at doing colour work there’s no reason why you couldn’t knit a design into the bunting.

Novelty yarns are perfect for bunting, either for whole triangles or as a crocheted or blanket stitched edge. Simple embroidery works well, as does the addition of buttons, beads and bells, particularly hanging from the bottom tip of each triangle.

The added weight of the beads and buttons make this bunting hang particularly well.

The added weight of the beads and buttons make this bunting hang particularly well.

Playing about with scale is fun too. You could make teeny tiny dollhouse bunting with lace weight yarn and very small needles, or go to the opposite extreme with supersized needles and multiple strands of super chunky yarn!

This bunting was knitted on the same size needles with the same yarn as the red and white bunting but with extra rows to make it larger.

This bunting was knitted on the same size needles with the same yarn as the red and white bunting but with extra rows to make it larger.

Whatever you do with this pattern, I’d love to see the results! You can share pictures on this pattern’s Ravelry page or on my Facebook page.

This bunting was made from odds and ends from my stash, a mixture of dk and aran as far as I could tell!

This bunting was made from odds and ends from my stash, a mixture of dk and aran as far as I could tell!

Have fun!

Beth 🙂

Moogly HOHD

3 thoughts on “BAM’s Basic Bunting – new knitting pattern!

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